Sep 272017
 

SIGHT & SOUND 2017 

Since 2009, Sight & Sound Festival seeks out the best and most provocative and outstanding work of digital art currently being made by international and local emerging artists. It embraces the fringe of contemporary digital art and culture through installations, performances, workshops, interventions, and discussions. Sight & Sound is seeing the unseen and hearing the unheard. It’s experiencing the indescribable. It is where contemporary digital art meets its political agenda. It’s a festival that invites the possibility of social change through art, music, and all-night dancing.

NON-COMPLIANT FUTURES

Under the theme [Non-Compliant Futures], Sight + Sound festival 2017 will perform an autopsy of the grand narrative of innovation, the very one which promised us a radiant future dependent upon hyperconsumption, techno-positivism, digital colonialism, and the myth of infinite growth. With over thirty international guests, the festival program, curated by Disnovation.org, will question the standardized imaginaries of the future and highlight intersecting paths and strategies that aim to reveal, perturb, and pervert the cult of innovation.

Following on from the gospel of progress, evolution, and growth from centuries past, today’s vocabulary of innovation and disruption are rhetorical instruments par excellence. They flood the dominant discourse of our times, flowing from the political arena into the fields of labour, education, and art. Meanwhile, in periphery to the daily onslaught of techno-solutionist propaganda, numerous critical, alternative, deviant, and speculative practices are (re)emerging globally. They pave the way to a critical and grassroots reappropriation of the possibilities envisioned by our technological society.

Sight + Sound 2017 calls to break free from a linear notion of progress and, rather, re-introduce concepts such as degrowth and maintainability to the core of our vision of the future. It is also an invitation to embrace our alien-becoming, which we are already collectively enduring with the whole of human and non-human life.

Together with artists, activists, performers, and theorists, NON-COMPLIANT FUTURES inhabits this tsunami of capitalism and human action by populating it with a host of artistic alternatives — rather unlikely but preferable possibilities that will act as the basis to broader debate and critical projections  into the future.

CURATORS 

DISNOVATION.ORG is a working group based in Paris, initiated by Nicolas Maigret and Maria Roszkowska. At the crossroads between contemporary art, research and hacking, the collective develops situations of disturbance, speculation, and debate, challenging the ideology of innovation and stimulating the emergence of alternative narratives. They recently edited The Pirate Book, an anthology on media piracy.

Venues

Eastern Bloc
7240 Clark Street, 2nd floor
Montréal, QC, H2R 2Y3
514 284-2106

Never Apart 
7049 Saint-Urbain Street
Montréal, QC, H2S 3H4
514 284-2106

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Sep 262017
 

Archives of the Common II. The Anomic Archive

Museo Reina Sofía
September 28, 29 and 30, 2017

The role the archive plays in contemporary culture, by virtue of its powerful metaphorical potential and as a tool of knowledge and resistance, has been broadly explored in many exhibitions, publications and encounters over the past two decades. For instance, to name but a few, shows such as Archive Fever: Uses of the Document in Contemporary Art (Okwui Enwezor, International Center of Photography, New York, 2008), or international encounters such as Speak, Memory: On Archives and other Strategies of (Re)activation of Cultural Memory (Townhouse Gallery, Cairo, 2010), Radical Archives (New York University, New York, 2014) and, in closer proximity, Archives of the Common (Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2015).

Against these backdrops, the analysis of the archive has occurred from a dual perspective. The first, after acknowledging the “archive shift” at the end of the 1990s, highlights the use of archive by artists as a source of primary information, as well as a device of formal structuring. The second involves artists’ and historians’ renewed interest in the archive, granting visibility and relevance to problems which, to some degree, affect a space bound to the exercise of power, surveillance and the imposition of norms to conserve substantial heritage of memory, experience and collective identities.

With the aim of moving this debate forward by formulating conditions for a genuinely alternative and radical practice with respect to the creation, access and management of archives, Archives of the Common II. The Anomic Archive seeks to lay out a space of reflection with which to share the survival strategies and work and consolidation methodologies being implemented by different people, collectives and institutions in different settings. Therefore, Archives of the Common II, the continuation of the encounter held at the end of 2015 in the Museo, coorganized by Museo Reina Sofía and RedCSur collects and expands upon the first edition to collectively consider and multiply, from potential modes of doing, the common uses of archive.

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
  •  September 26, 2017
  •  Tagged with:
Sep 062017
 

Art x Cuba – Contemporary Perspectives since 1989
http://ludwigforum.de/en/event/kunst-x-kuba/
09/08/2017 – 02/18/2018
Opening: 09/07/2017
Ludwig Forum for International Art Aachen, Alemania.

The collection of Peter and Irene Ludwig is home to one of the largest and earliest assemblies of contemporary Cuban art in Europe. This fascinating part of the collection primarily developed during the eighties and nineties, a time of crisis as well as attempts to overcome it, and offers insights into the visual art of this Caribbean state. With the exhibition Art x Cuba – Contemporary Perspectives since 1989, the Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst will stage, for the first time, an encounter between works from the Aachen collection and more recent works from Cuba. This multilayered dialogue with 150 works by 72 artists opens up a discussion about the aesthetic, thematic, and formal development of Cuban art. Furthermore, the broadly-conceived exhibition project and accompanying publication also raise questions about the relationships between culture and politics, art and the market, globalization and power.

With generous support of the Peter and Irene Ludwig Foundation and the German Federal Cultural Foundation.

Patron of the exhibition: Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs Sigmar Gabriel

Curators: Andreas Beitin and Antonio Eligio (Tonel)

Curatorial assistance: Janice Mitchell and Denise Petzold

 

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
  •  September 6, 2017
Aug 082017
 

CUBA IS
SEP 9, 2017 – MAR 4, 2018

Revealing complexities on–and off–the island, Cuba Is explores aspects of Cuba not easily accessed by foreigners–and sometimes not even by Cubans themselves. Born from indigenous, African and European roots, divergent politics and limitations in communication and commerce, the Cuba seen in this exhibition goes beyond the folklore and offers new insight into its current reality. Over 120 photos feature subjects ranging from defiant youth known as “Frikis” to the hard-partying children of the 1%, the underground system of sharing digital content–“El paquete”–to Miami’s Chonga girls.

Photographs by Elliott Erwitt, Leysis Quesada, Raúl Cañibano, Tria Giovan and others examine aspects of the island not easily accessed by foreigners and Cubans alike. In addition, an original documentary film—produced by the Annenberg Foundation—follows the exhibition’s photographers as they capture unseen images of life in Havana and beyond.

Complementing this rare, immersive look into Cuban life is a virtual reality experience that delves into Cuba’s current dynamic music scene, allowing visitors to virtually stroll along the storied Malecón.

The Cuba Is exhibit is part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

Annenberg Space for Photography
2000 Avenue of the Stars
Los Angeles, CA 90067

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
  •  August 8, 2017
May 222017
 

Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara is proud to present Free Play, an exhibition that brings contemporary furniture, architecture, artworks, and objects from an international selection of designers, architects, and artists to Santa Barbara. MCASB commissioned acclaimed design expert Alexandra Cunningham Cameron to curate the exhibition.

Free Play centers around the idea of play as an influential actor in the design process, producing work which intimately reveals our drive toward novelty, upending traditional notions about the role of design in our lives. Each creator shares an alternate view of the world through objects which appropriate childhood motifs, employ satire, and generate form through chance. This sense of freedom results in works that are wonderfully illogical, whimsical, and poignant.

Free Play is a collection of objects and architecture which stand apart from the contemporary world’s increasing movement toward efficiency and automation. These works share daydreams, jokes and stories. They pursue pleasure,” says Cunningham Cameron. “We study material culture to better understand the trajectory of civilizations. Free Play suggests how looking at the products of play rather than necessity reveals more about how we got here and where we’re going.”

Cunningham Cameron has been immersed in the design world for more than a decade as a curator, advisor, and writer. In her role as Creative Director for Design Miami/, she worked alongside some of the most groundbreaking designers and architects from around the world, many of whom are included in Free Play.

The exhibition design, by Berlin-based Sam Chermayeff Office, is a labyrinth of personal moments and stories. The impressive lineup of creators included in the exhibition features names such as Maarten Baas, Design Miami’s 2009 Designer of the Year; Nendo, named Designer of the Year by Wallpaper MagazineElle Decor and Maison & Objet in 2015; LA-based Jimenez Lai, founder of Bureau Spectacular; and Snarkitecture, whose installation piece The Beach has been touring globally since 2015. Katie Stout, the 2015 winner of HGTV’s show Ellen’s Design Challenge and who was recently named to Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list, will also have work in the exhibition – a work commissioned specifically for Free Play.

As design culture achieves wider popularity around the world, Free Play introduces a design exhibition that aims to initiate a dialogue around that blurred question of what comprises art in today’s day and age.

Exhibition curator: Alexandra Cunningham Cameron

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Apr 262017
 

Ernesto Oroza
THE TRANSPARENT OBJECT
Cuba, 1995 – 2016

Mmuseumm
Opening:
Thursday May 11
7pm
4 Courtlandt Alley
NYC, NY 10013

Special Period in Times of Peace was how the Cuban government termed the country’s crisis in 1990. The Soviet demise brought bilateral trade to a halt, resulting in a deep economic crisis on the island. Cuba’s international isolation and domestic shortages were made more acute by the longstanding U.S. embargo.

Commercial networks fell apart. There was no fuel to maintain either a public transportation system or the electricity grid. All industry slowed down dramatically due to shortages in primary materials and a lack of access to international markets. Cubans saw their surroundings, from their domestic space to their urban environment, deteriorate at an accelerated pace.

The country’s centralized economy imploded at its inner core: the home. The family became an autonomous economic unit. Workers, musicians, physicians, athletes –all had to confront the severe scarcity of resources with creativity and cooperation.

The transparent object is an early 20th century concept formulated by Boris Arvatov, a Soviet theorist of productivism. In his critique to the object and the capitalist mode of production, he called for a transparent object that would not hide the traces of its production. In absence of a conducive economic context for the production of transparent socialist objects, Arvatov suggested the provisional transformation of capitalist objects, according to the new social demands.

From this perspective, many of the objects created in Cuba during the crisis can be considered transparent objects. They are artifacts that render visible the social and collaborative relations among individuals, confronted with pressing needs and constrained by specific material, technological and intellectual resources. Objects apparently useless were torn apart for repair, reuse and recycling, and the technical knowledge thereby obtained was socialized among friends and neighbors. In many cases, reinvented objects were self-explanatory, and their technological process of production easily replicated.

One more turn around. A vinyl record rotates like the blade of a repaired Soviet fan. They spin, vinyl record and fan, on a rotating commercial display that returns like a tactic productivist display that seeks the passerby’s activation. Another turn around…

————
Text by Ernesto Oroza for Mmuseumm, 2017
Color of the display was commissioned to Architect Fabián Martínez
Special thanks to Clara Astiasarán, Ariana Hernández-Reguant and Pernod Ricard Fellowship-2016 at Villa Vassilieff.

 

General Information
info@mmuseumm.com

Press
press@mmuseumm.com

Mailing Address:
Mmuseumm
368 Broadway #512
NYC, NY 10013

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Mar 112017
 

Adiós Utopia: Dreams and Deceptions in Cuban Art Since 1950 looks at how Cuba’s revolutionary aspirations for social utopia—and subsequent disillusionment—shaped 65 years of Cuban art. The exhibition brings together more than 100 of the most important works of painting, graphic design, photography, video, installation, and performance created by more than 50 Cuban artists and designers.

Anchored by key moments of 20th- and 21st-century Cuban history, Adiós Utopia is the most comprehensive and significant presentation of modern and contemporary Cuban art shown in the United States since 1944, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York presented Modern Cuban Painters.

Although many artists have emigrated from Cuba to live and work abroad, Adiós Utopia focuses on the untold narrative of those artists who remained in Cuba or whose careers took off after Fidel Castro’s 1959 revolution. Through a selection of pivotal artworks—created in each of six decades since 1950—the exhibition explores Cuba’s artistic production through the lens of utopia, both its construction and its deconstruction. Adiós Utopia introduces U.S. audiences to key events in Cuban history and explores how this history affected individual artists, shaped the character of art produced on the island, and conditioned the reception of Cuban art both in Cuba and abroad.

Curated by Gerardo Mosquera, Rene Francisco, Elsa Vega and Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO).
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston | 1001 Bissonnet, Houston, Texas 77005

Continue reading »

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Jan 022017
 

capture_d_e_cran_2017-01-06_a_15-12-35-4c222

http://villavassilieff.net/IMG/pdf/vvjournal03-couleur.compressed.pdf

“Tell me the story of all these things. Beginning wherever you wish, tell even us.”
➡ Opening
January 14th, from 2 to 9 PM
➡ Exhibition until March 18, 2017
Opened from 11 AM to 7 PM

press release: http://villavassilieff.net/IMG/pdf/press-kit_tell-me-the-story_en.pdf

With: Katinka Bock, Vittorio Cavallini, León Ferrari, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Sojung Jun, Rose Lowder, Somnath Mukherjee, Ernesto Oroza, Remzi Rasa, Vuth Lyno
* Curators: Mélanie Bouteloup & Victorine Grataloup

“Tell me the story of all these things” borrows its title from “Dictée”, a novel written in 1982 by artist Theresa Hak Kyung Cha. Addressing issues of displacement, migration, and exile, a constellation of texts and artworks revolve around Pernod Ricard Fellow Sojung Jun’s videos. Her work draws micronarratives of marginalized individuals and threatened local traditions.

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Jan 012017
 

The Monobloc Project
an exhibition created by Franck Dujoux and Michel Kowalski

Plus d’une trentaine d’œuvres pour ce premier opus du The Monobloc Project #monoblocproject :
5.5 Designers / Adrian Ghenie / Bert Loeschner / Breaded Escalope / Cyrille Candas / Ernesto Oroza / Etienne Bossut / Fabien Buring / Front / Harald Köhneke / Helmut Batzner / Jens Thiel & Erik Niedling / Joe Colombo / Jürgen Lindemann / Kai Linke / Kilian Schindler / Maarten Baas / Manuel / Raeder / Marti Guixé / Mike Simonian & Maaike Evers / Pool / Ralph Ball & Maxine Naylor / Rebecca Ahlstedt / Rolf Sachs / Sam Durant / Stéphane Magnin / Tina Roeder / Thomas Schnur / Vico Magistretti / Volker Albus
c0wov11wqaekuzk-jpg-large

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Aug 062016
 
Ernesto Oroza, Untitled (Habitat cell made out with euphorbia trigona shrubs and an aluminum door.) From architecture of necessity, 2012

Ernesto Oroza, Untitled (Habitat cell made out with euphorbia trigona shrubs and an aluminum door.) From architecture of necessity, 2012

Curated by William Cordova

Nov. 5, 2016 – Jan. 8, 2017
Opening Reception: Friday, Nov. 4, 2016

“we should want … [our] relationship to space to evoke architecture as it is informed by the humanities, not architecture simply as a technical art.” -LaVerne Wells-Bowie (Art On My Mind: Visual Politics: bell hooks)

The works selected by curator William Cordova represent four generations of South Florida artists whose practice is informed and rooted in the geography, community and multi-cultural diversity of the region. These are artists who have endured and evolved as South Florida has changed, and yet still transcend the boundaries of expectation.

The exhibition offers a glimpse into the prism of South Florida art through sculpture, painting, drawing, audio and film. The works are derived from many different parts of the region and utilize a variety of concepts and scale. Exhibiting artists include the late Purvis Young, the first real home-grown talent whose prolific and complex work gained international critical acclaim well before the 2000s; Karen Rifas, whose expansive site-specific ephemeral installations have been a trademark and influence on the ever-evolving local scene since the 1970s; Robert Thiele, the first Florida artist to be included in the prestigious Whitney Biennial (1975); Juana Valdes, whose work has been included in various biennials, including the Havana and SITE Santa Fe biennials, and yet locally goes unnoticed by major museums; and Onajide Shabaka, visual artist, anthropologist, botanist and writer, a cultural practitioner whose artistic depth and contributions remain unmatched. These are only a few of the many practitioners whose works will be highlighted in this survey of a southern Florida collective.

“those who ain’t got it can’t show it, those who got it can’t hide it” — Zora Neale Hurston

more info here: http://artandculturecenter.org/transphysics-istwa-landscapes-paisajes

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
May 082016
 

Screen Shot 2016-05-08 at 12.30.23 AM

2016 ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART FLORIDA PRIZE IN CONTEMPORARY ART

May 13 – August 14, 2016

The Florida Prize in Contemporary Art is an initiative of the Orlando Museum of Art that brings a new level of recognition to the State’s most progressive artists. Now in its third year, the 2016 exhibition will present ten outstanding artists, with one selected to receive the prize. These artists work in a range of media and artistic practices, often in new and unexpected ways. The challenging nature of their work will offer Museum visitors insight into the complex and exciting world of contemporary art in Florida.

This year’s artists are: Anthea Behm, Gainesville; Adler Guerrier, Miami; María Martínez-Cañas, Miami; Noelle Mason, Tampa; Ernesto Oroza, Aventura; Matt Roberts, Deland; Dawn Roe, Winter Park; Kyle Trowbridge, Coral Gables; Michael Vasquez, Miami; and Sergio Vega, Gainesville.

Continue reading »

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Apr 062016
 

DSC_0343-Ernesto-Oroza
FUTURS NON-CONFORMES
An exhibition curated by Nicolas Maigret, artist, curator et teacher at the Parsons School Paris
April 7th – October 2016

FUTURS NON-CONFORMES ventures the hypothesis that a form of ‘propaganda of innovation’ exists and that this propaganda has become, in turn, the focal point for a series of artistic counterstrategies which are critical, experimental and speculative in nature.

Continue reading »

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Mar 092016
 

Implied Interaction: The Role of Participant, Artist and Viewer  in selected works from the CINTAS Foundation Fellows Collection

February 24 – July 17, 2016A selection of nine works from the CINTAS Foundation Fellows Collection, Implied Interaction explores the artists’ imprint on and/or interaction with a specific work. Whether implied or explicit, each artwork exemplifies how the viewer forms a lasting conversation to complete each piece. Artists represented in this exhibition are past winners of the prestigious CINTAS Foundation Fellowship in Visual Arts that honors artists of Cuban descent, including Felipe Dulzaides, Coco Fusco, Guerra de la Paz, Jillian Mayer, Ana Mendieta, Gean Moreno, Ernesto Oroza and Ernesto de la Vega Pujol. The exhibition is a brief encounter with each artist’s esteemed practice and provides a glimpse into the depth of the prestigious CINTAS Foundation Fellows in Visual Arts.

Since 2011, the CINTAS Foundation has entrusted MDC’s Museum of Art + Design to serve as stewards of the CINTAS Fellows Collection, comprised of nearly 300 pieces by artists of Cuban descent living outside Cuba who have received prestigious CINTAS Fellowships, awarded since 1963.

Location Information:
Freedom Tower
600 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, FL 33132Freedom Tower – Second Floor

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
  •  March 9, 2016
Feb 202016
 

Collaboration with Rafael Domenech.
Lattice (celosía): cut and folded drywall/sheetrock – CNC.
Nomadic display in Miami Maker Fair 2016

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Feb 032016
 

brutal beauty
Brutal Beauty

Violence and Contemporary Design

7 February – 1 May 2016, Marta Herford (Lippold Gallery, 1st floor)

Opening: Sunday, 7 February, at 11:30 a.m.

Whether in political conflicts or conflicts in everyday life – the subject of violence is ever-present. Against the background of international terrorism and the current streams of refugees from war zones, the subject is more topical than ever.

But how do designers deal with violence? What responsibility do they bear, and which possibilities for action do they open up in this highly dynamic process? Marta Herford introduces a whole new generation of designers whose designs and strategies are making violence visible in order to take a stance against the often devastating worldwide developments now and in the future. They are no longer concerned solely with the design of the perfect product, but rather with shaping social processes. As an engine for participation or inclusion, design can thus be understood as the opposite to submission (Vilém Flusser).

The exhibition also points up the dark side of design. Although design is meant to serve humans in a wide variety of ways, if we look more closely, violence and design are like Siamese twins. Because, at the latest in the production stage, a material is – brutally – forced into a particular shape. In addition to this, a lot of product developments have military origins. The ugly face of design is ultimately exposed when things are no longer usable and have to be disposed of.

The Belgian design expert Max Borka (Berlin) serves as an advisor to the Marta team for “Brutal Beauty”, the scenography for the exhibition is designed by Matthias Megyeri (Stuttgart/London).

Participating designers, artists and projecs

Barnaby Barford, Jeremy Bentham, James Bridle, Anthony Burrill/ Ewoudt Boonstra, Jordi Canudas, Paolo Chiasera, Curro Claret, Ray und Charles Eames, Ron From, Dave Hakkens, Elham Seyed Javad, Chris Jordan, Cyrus Kabiru, Ronen Kadushin, Jan Pieter Kaptein, An-Sofie Kesteleyn, Landfillharmonic, Eva Lechner, Ross Lovegrove, Matthias Megyeri, Yael Mer/ Shay Alkalay, Guy Mishaly, Azusa Murakami/ Alexander Groves, George Nelson, Ernesto Oroza, Marijn van der Poll, Michael Sailstorfer, Skateistan, Jair Straschnow/ Bert Kramer/ Gitte Nygaard, Ezri Tarazi, Carolien Vlieger/ Hein van Dam, Tobias Vollmer, Dominic Wilcox u.a.

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
  •  February 3, 2016