Feb 202016
 

Collaboration with Rafael Domenech.
Lattice (celosía): cut and folded drywall/sheetrock – CNC.
Nomadic display in Miami Maker Fair 2016

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Nov 202013
 

Georgia Bullets
Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza
November 12 –  December 21
CCE Miami

Georgia Bullets is a project that runs parallel to TAPAS: Spanish Design for Food, a major traveling exhibition that focuses on the work of Spanish designers in relation to food and culinary cultures. Georgia Bullets assumes a perspective that is, at once, the opposite of and a compliment to the relationship between professional design and culinary production: it looks at the anonymous and popular configurations that emerge around local food cultures. It focuses on non-professional production of objects, graphics, and behaviors within the context in which they are generated and employed. It also aims to understand how this localized production deals with the multitude of generic objects which, due to their economic accessibility, have invaded the city.

Along with an exhibition component, the project includes a pair of workshops with students from DASH (Design and Architecture Senior High School) and with students from the Culinary Institute of Miami Dade College. A 32-page tabloid, in a run of 20,000 copies, has been produced as an integral part of Georgia Bullets and will distributed at various points throughout the city. The tabloid is part of an editorial project–www.tabloid.org–that Moreno and Oroza have been developing since 2009.

Special thanks to Julie Kahn for allowing us to present a slideshow related to her project Swamp Cabbage, an investigation into local Florida food cultures, as part of this exhibition.

Georgia bullets at Design Log

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Nov 022013
 
Gerogia Bullets - CCE Miami - 2013

Gerogia Bullets – CCE Miami – 2013

Images here

Opening Nov 12, 2013 – on view until December 21
At CCEMiami – Free admission

Exhibition by Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza, as a parallel project to TAPAS: Spanish Design for Food. It will include a 32-page Tabloid, workshops with students from DASH and the Culinary Institute at Miami Dade College, and different collection of objects.

Continue reading »

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Oct 142013
 

Visit: http://thetabloid.org/

Tabloids are series of newspapers that are produced in relation to specific exhibitions. One side of the newspaper pages, patterns (usually determined by elements within the exhibitions) are printed. These are used as wallpapers to designate particular spaces within the exhibition sites. The rest ofthe newspapers are used to present materials that in some way expand or question the conceptual scope of the exhibition.


Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
May 222013
 

chi-wen gallery

Dreams and Realities : Visions from Taiwan and Cuba of a Post Cold-War WorldChi-Wen Gallery in collaboration with Peter Kalb and Joe Lin- Hill, at Art Basel in Hong Kong, from May 23rd – 26th, 2013.
Download PDF

 

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Mar 172013
 

2013/03/17
Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza
http://artforum.com/picks/section=us#picks39518

ALEJANDRA VON HARTZ GALLERY
2630 NW 2nd. Avenue
February 7–March 28

View of “Drywood,” 2013. “Drywood,” the title of this exhibition, refers to Cryptotermes brevis, a termite that can survive with barely any water, relying on six rectal glands to retain all moisture from digested matter. Endemic in Florida, it is an apt symbol in the hands of Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza, who here use the insect to signify another tropical infestation—the tourist souvenir. Just like a termite gnaws through walls, a souvenir eliminates the distance between cities and undermines their autonomous identity by propagating a simplistic, generic reading of a place. For their first exhibition at this gallery, Moreno and Oroza have placed twelve cement balls—each fifteen inches in diameter—in two neat rows across the front space. Before the concrete was poured, the artists stuffed the molds for the balls with Florida-branded beach towels featuring dolphins and sunsets, and now the spheres hemorrhage patches of brightly colored terrycloth. In its raw materiality and its role as a protective shell, the concrete hints at both the manufacture and the transportation of these souvenir items. Moreover, the anonymous surfaces, crisp and unadorned save for the prints of sea turtles peeking through, underscore the inherent sameness of all tourist items—the tchotchke Platonic ideal.

But the cracking face of the spheres realizes a breakdown of the logical dissemination of the souvenir and similar consumer items, a crisis that is examined in the rest of the show. Stapled to the walls in ordered repetition are twenty-four issues of Tabloid, Moreno and Oroza’s single-page newsprint journal, at once a record of their practice and an ongoing critique of mass production. A bootleg copy of Glauber Rocha’s 1972 Brazilian film Cancer plays in the back room. The visceral memory of the Brazilian avant-garde is evoked by Rocha’s self-proclaimed experiment in minimal editing, and within this streamlined world of the spheres and the newspapers, it is a rambling, amorphous intrusion. Like the termite, the film burrows through the traditional borders of shot and scene by actively ignoring editing. Here is the crux of Moreno and Orozas’s argument—an attempt to unite the production and distribution of souvenirs through the strange biology of termites. Throughout the show, the uneasy placement of the objects foreshadows future rupture. The artists have set the spheres on the cracks between the floorboards and one, set off by the crack, seems to be threatening to tunnel—not unlike Cryptotermes brevis—right through the drywall. — Hunter Braithwaite

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Feb 132013
 

ernesto-oroza---gean-moreno---drywood
Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza: Drywood
February 7 – March 28, 2013
Opening Reception: Thursday, February 7, 2013, from 7 to 10pm

Alejandra von Hartz Gallery is pleased to present “Drywood,” a solo exhibition of collaborative works by Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza. The show runs from February 7 to March 28, 2013. An opening reception will take place on Thursday, February 7th, from 7 to 10pm.

Continue reading »

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Feb 072013
 

Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza: Drywood
February 7 – March 28, 2013
Opening Reception: Thursday, February 7, 2013, from 7 to 10pm

Alejandra von Hartz Gallery is pleased to present “Drywood,” a solo exhibition of collaborative works by Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza. The show runs from February 7 to March 28, 2013. An opening reception will take place on Thursday, February 7th, from 7 to 10pm.

As they have done in their previous research-driven projects, Moreno and Oroza begin by zeroing in on contemporary variations of an object typology — in this case, they began with the souvenir — in an effort to understand how it functions in relation to forces of contemporary production, the generation of urban morphology and identity, and the changing terrain of user engagement. With this new project, they seek to understand how generic production, embodied in the souvenir, stands as both the ultimate horizon of rationalization in object design and a generative force that increasingly determines our urban environments. At Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Moreno and Oroza will present a series of concrete spheres which, during the casting process, swallowed souvenir objects. These are an effort to mesh two objects that are distributed throughout the city: the generic spheres that serve as obstacles and place-markers and artifacts that serve to develop identity narratives for the city. The layout of the spheres and the quantity employed has been determined by the wooden sheets (modules) that make up the gallery’s floor.
Along with the spheres, Moreno and Oroza will present a series of compositions, assembled by others, that employ pages from the Tabloid (www.thetabloid.org) that they have been producing over the last four years. The display of these compositions will be determined by the metric constraints of the standard tabloid. The Tabloid has served as a repository for their research and texts, a documentary vehicle, and a space to enlarge the discursive space of their practice and the exhibitions in which they participate. Hans Ulrich Obrist, Joe Scanlan, Yona Friedman, Hito Steyerl, and Peter Lang, among a number of other theorists and cultural producers, have contributed to the Tabloid. Moreno and Oroza will also present a bootleg copy of Glauber Rocha’s film Cancer and zines filled with pirated essays by Argentinean designer-painter-theorist Tomas Maldonado and Brazilian filmmaker Glauber Rocha.
Download Tabloid # 24 here

For more information, please contact the gallery at info@alejandravonhartz.com or call 305.438.0220. Please, visit our website at www.alejandravonhartz.net
Alejandra von Hartz Gallery
2630 NW 2nd. Avenue

Copyright Oriol Tarridas_2013

Drywood — Hunter Braithwaite
2013/03/17
http://artforum.com/picks/section=us#picks39518
“Drywood,” the title of this exhibition, refers to Cryptotermes brevis, a termite that can survive with barely any water, relying on six rectal glands to retain all moisture from digested matter. Endemic in Florida, it is an apt symbol in the hands of Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza, who here use the insect to signify another tropical infestation—the tourist souvenir. Just like a termite gnaws through walls, a souvenir eliminates the distance between cities and undermines their autonomous identity by propagating a simplistic, generic reading of a place. For their first exhibition at this gallery, Moreno and Oroza have placed twelve cement balls—each fifteen inches in diameter—in two neat rows across the front space. Before the concrete was poured, the artists stuffed the molds for the balls with Florida-branded beach towels featuring dolphins and sunsets, and now the spheres hemorrhage patches of brightly colored terrycloth. In its raw materiality and its role as a protective shell, the concrete hints at both the manufacture and the transportation of these souvenir items. Moreover, the anonymous surfaces, crisp and unadorned save for the prints of sea turtles peeking through, underscore the inherent sameness of all tourist items—the tchotchke Platonic ideal.

But the cracking face of the spheres realizes a breakdown of the logical dissemination of the souvenir and similar consumer items, a crisis that is examined in the rest of the show. Stapled to the walls in ordered repetition are twenty-four issues of Tabloid, Moreno and Oroza’s single-page newsprint journal, at once a record of their practice and an ongoing critique of mass production. A bootleg copy of Glauber Rocha’s 1972 Brazilian film Cancer plays in the back room. The visceral memory of the Brazilian avant-garde is evoked by Rocha’s self-proclaimed experiment in minimal editing, and within this streamlined world of the spheres and the newspapers, it is a rambling, amorphous intrusion. Like the termite, the film burrows through the traditional borders of shot and scene by actively ignoring editing. Here is the crux of Moreno and Orozas’s argument—an attempt to unite the production and distribution of souvenirs through the strange biology of termites. Throughout the show, the uneasy placement of the objects foreshadows future rupture. The artists have set the spheres on the cracks between the floorboards and one, set off by the crack, seems to be threatening to tunnel—not unlike Cryptotermes brevis—right through the drywall.

— Hunter Braithwaite

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Jan 222013
 

orange tsunami
Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza: Orange tsunami

Wharton + Espinosa is pleased to present “Orange Tsunami,” the first West Coast solo exhibition of collaborative works by Miami-based artists Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza. With an opening reception on January 17 from 5:30-8:30PM, the show runs through March 8, 2013. As part of “Orange Tsunami,” Moreno and Oroza have published Tabloid #23 (download the PDF here).

What would happen if all the shops in a tourist location would begin to be invaded by an abstract souvenir that everyone recognized as a malefic mass? Or what would happen if someone attempted to produce a souvenir that sought less to draw an emotional link to a private experience than to liberate the forces of sidetracked emancipatory projects? What would happen if a devastating invasive species leapt into the field of souvenir production and became a sign of the place it is devastating? – GM + EO

Continue reading »

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Nov 112012
 

macrovision

Marakka 2012 is a project by Magdiel Aspillaga and Ernesto Oroza

First presentation: December 7, 7-11 pm
Address: Buena Vista Building, 180 NE 39 St. Suite 204, Miami FL 33137

Since 1983, Waldo Fernandez “Marakka” has been assembling an archive of Cuban audiovisual memory. The collection–which functions commercially under the “Marakka 2000” brand–relies and exploits a loophole created by current Cuba-U.S. diplomatic relations, and is sustained by a precise and astute understanding of current procedures regarding the protection of copyright in the U.S.
Each generation of emigrants has put its own nostalgic claims to the archive, which has more that 14,000 objects. Waldo has processed all this material in order to add new credits, remove sensitive copyright issues, and even re-edit the dramaturgical time and pace of serials and soap operas in order to adjust them for suitable commercial formats. The pinnacle of the archive lies in the documentaries that Waldo himself has directed and edited using video clips and sounds from his collection.
“Marakka 2012” is a revision of “Marakka 2000”. From our perspective, Waldo’s archive is above all else a registry of its own constitution. A repertoire of source formats, a history of the transfers produced and the copying technologies employed. A deposit of all the available resolutions of the last 70 years. A monument to piracy, to the glory of anti-macrovisions.

http://www.marakka2000.com

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Oct 132012
 

freddy-mam

freddyii

FREDDY (in collaboration with Gean Moreno)
Freddy is a coupling system that allows the production of numerous different architectural spaces and object typologies. It exploits standard plywood sizes and the stackability of the plastic bucket. Various iterations of the system exist.
It has been used to produce:
– an outdoor pavilion ( commissioned by the Bass Museum in October 2009)
– an outdoor pavilion ( commissioned by the Miami Art Museum, 2010)
– an indoor pavilion, of which two versión exist, one using 8’ x 4’ planes and the other using 16” x 96” planes
– a series of tables
– a series of display structures
– a pop-up shop/display kiosk
Freddy is linked to a larger research Project involved with the understanding and theorizing of generic objects as the function at multiple levels, from the circuits of global trade to their repurposing in low-income neighborhoods. A text on generic objects was published in E-FLUX JOURNAL 18.
Using repeating, standard units allows Freddy a certain flexibility in producing spaces with incorporated seating arrangements, tables, stools, lamps, trash bins, and display shelves.
Each of the patterns used in the planar modules is indexed by a different color.

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter
Oct 132011
 

oroza-moreno-jenny jenny-oroza-moreno

Jenny is part of a series of projects that explore objects that have been taken out of the infrastructures and circulation systems for which they were designed, and have subsequently been employed in unexpected ways. The goal of these projects is to recognize and record the new logics that are applied to these objects, while, at the same time, attempting to push further the productive and re-purposing impulses that underscore them.
Jenny is a modular unit that exploits the stackability of milk crates in order to optimize the use of these objects and to produce functional architectural spaces. It has been used as screen room seating, a display structure, and a bookshelf.
Jenny comes in two sizes: 48” and 72”. Each sized is indexed by a different color.

A text on generic objects was published in E-FLUX JOURNAL 18.

Jenny

Print this pageShare on FacebookEmail this to someonePin on PinterestShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter