Sep 142013
 

Untitled (Project of Amphitheater for the Museum of Cuban Modern Architecture), 2012
Architectural model, Scale: 1:6. Cast cement (rockite), dirt.

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Dec 182012
 

ernesto-oroza-ujamaa

more info at Aluna Art Foundation website

UJAMAA: Inertia of the Vine
Works by Ernesto Oroza

From December 5th to January 15th/2013 at Aluna Art Foundation | Focus Locus

An installation that derives its name from a political group which sought in Africa the utopia of collectivism accounting for traces of anonymous and collective forms of creation, in which the fatality of nature and culture constitutes not only a symbiosis but a cycle of endless return.
Aluna Curatorial Collective

Ujamaa. Inertia of the vine

The Bejuco (climbing woody vine of the tropics) is the son of Dadá.The Bejuco, which has the same autistic inertia as Kurt Schwitter’s “Merzbau”, is the son of Dada Baldoné, the Yoruba goddess of vegetables. A rural ─and strangely universal─ myth asserts that all the bejucos are only one –an interminable one. It is even said that there is a great circle. Others speak of many “bejucos” forming closed loops, huge plant rings where the logic of the infinite is multiplied. In any case, if you find an end, it means that a circle has been broken.

The persistent and whimsical strength that inhabits the bejuco lies hidden in the city. It animates some bodies, collapses others; it nourishes unexpected flows. The accumulations of wood around some trees in the city come to my mind. The wooden trunk, processed and “shrunken”, returns to its origin. Baldoné, who is bejuco sap and guizazo seeds, shakes the vegetable kingdom, rejects the carpenter’s epiphany: the technological grain and edge. Wood is wood. The movement of the stick in the city makes a loop. From tree to tree, it closes a circle. In the meantime, because that is what Dadá permits, the trunk is subject of labor, time unit, exchange value, subject to rule. Or at least it is ideally that.

There where things cannot be named as Home Legend Honey, Marazzi Imperial Slate, Three Rivers Gold Slate – where Home Depot has not yet arrived – materials are subjugated by the force of need, that latency as powerful as the bejuco, which can contain a coffee field or drown a river.

Ujamaa. Inercia de bejuco

Bejuco es hijo de Dadá. El bejuco, que tiene la misma inercia autista del merzbau de Schwitter es hijo de Dada baldoné la diosa yoruba de los vegetales. Se afirma en un mito rural y extrañamente universal que todos lo bejucos son uno solo, si encuentras un extremo significa que se ha roto un círculo. Según la leyenda hay bejucos cerrados que forman enormes lazos, se aíslan al unir sus dos extremos, la naturaleza queda suspendida por su propia lógica.

La fuerza persistente y caprichosa que habita en el bejuco subyace en la ciudad. Anima cuerpos, colapsa otros, alimenta inesperados flujos. Pienso en las acumulaciones de maderas alrededor de algunos arboles en la ciudad. El palo, procesado y “consumido”, retorna a su origen. Baldoné, que es baba de bejuco y semilla de guizazo sacude el universo vegetal, rechaza la epifanía del carpintero: la cara y el canto tecnológicos. Madera es madera. Hace un lazo (loop) el movimiento del palo por la urbe. De árbol a árbol cierra un círculo. En el ínterin, porque eso es lo que permite Dadá, el madero es sujeto de labor, unidad de tiempo, valor de cambio, objeto de norma. O al menos idealmente.

Alli donde las cosas no pueden ser nombradas como Home Legend Honey, Marazzi Imperial Slate, Three Rivers Gold Slate, –donde aun no arriba Home Depot– las materias están subyugadas por la fuerza de la necesidad, esa latencia tan poderosa como el bejuco, que puede encerrar un campo de café o ahogar un rio.

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Dec 112012
 

gallery-diet-2012

gallery-diet-2012-2 tabloid-2012-diet-4

Khamsa-izm
Gallery Diet
http://gallerydiet.com/2012/03/21/khamsa-izm-organized-by-nicolas-lobo/
November 30th 2012—January X, 2013
Organized by Nicolas Lobo
An exhibition in which the moral circuit between the eye and the hand is traveled.

Featuring work by: Kenneth Tam, Martijn Hendriks, Alyse Emdur, Harun Farocki, Bill Daniel, Peter Bagge, Unica Zurn, Daniel Newman,Emmett Moore, and The Tabloid by Gean Moreno and Ernesto Oroza.
Can the eyes project evil? What does the act of looking do to affect the things we look at? If the eyes function as a deterministic mechanism for the actions taken by the hands, it seems to be a very difficult mechanism to negotiate.  The works included in this show interrogate the moral tension between the eyes, the hand or may be simply a result of the pressures of both.
One can sit on Emmett Moore’s bench: a toppled fiberglass trashcan in the center of the exhibition space.  The trashcan is painted a saturated aqua color and its design suggests origins in a theme park or outdoor mall from the mid 20th century.  Describing an act of delinquency by a hand in an environment we can imagine with wry familiarity, the seating sets the tone for what is to be viewed from it.  For example, in Harun Faroki’s filmEye/Machine, we see images taken by the machines of war themselves; the pictures don’t quite fit the rubric of propaganda. Instead the film suggests a policy of image-making that may have eclipsed the other functions of armed conflict.
Where we can see these ethical traces we may be tempted to follow the morality described by them.  First we should consider not only the images but also how they are seen. What ethical modifiers are the viewing conditions?  Can the eye inflect these hand marks with its own possibly deviant urges?

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Dec 012012
 

w-oroza-benches-5

A research that derives its name from a political group which sought in Africa the utopia of collectivism accounting for traces of anonymous and collective forms of creation, in which the fatality of nature and culture constitutes not only a symbiosis but a cycle of endless return.

Ujamaa. Inertia of the vine

The Bejuco (climbing woody vine of the tropics) is the son of Dadá. The Bejuco, which has the same autistic inertia as Kurt Schwitter’s “Merzbau”, is the son of Dada Baldoné, the Yoruba goddess of vegetables. A rural ─and strangely universal─ myth asserts that all the bejucos are only one –an interminable one. It is even said that there is a great circle. Others speak of many “bejucos” forming closed loops, huge plant rings where the logic of the infinite is multiplied. In any case, if you find an end, it means that a circle has been broken.

The persistent and whimsical strength that inhabits the bejuco lies hidden in the city. It animates some bodies, collapses others; it nourishes unexpected flows. The accumulations of wood around some trees in the city come to my mind. The wooden trunk, processed and “shrunken”, returns to its origin. Baldoné, who is bejuco sap and guizazo seeds, shakes the vegetable kingdom, rejects the carpenter’s epiphany: the technological grain and edge. Wood is wood. The movement of the stick in the city makes a loop. From tree to tree, it closes a circle. In the meantime, because that is what Dadá permits, the trunk is subject of labor, time unit, exchange value, subject to rule. Or at least it is ideally that.

There where things cannot be named as Home Legend Honey, Marazzi Imperial Slate, Three Rivers Gold Slate – where Home Depot has not yet arrived – materials are subjugated by the force of need, that latency as powerful as the bejuco, which can contain a coffee field or drown a river.

Ujamaa. Inercia de bejuco

Bejuco es hijo de Dadá. El bejuco, que tiene la misma inercia autista del merzbau de Schwitter es hijo de Dada baldoné la diosa yoruba de los vegetales. Se afirma en un mito rural y extrañamente universal que todos lo bejucos son uno solo, si encuentras un extremo significa que se ha roto un círculo. Leyenda derivadas aseguran que son muchos los bejucos que se cierran para forman enormes lazos, se aíslan del mundo al unir sus dos extremos, queda suspendida la naturaleza en su propia lógica.

La fuerza persistente y caprichosa que habita en el bejuco subyace en la ciudad. Anima cuerpos, colapsa otros, alimenta inesperados flujos. Pienso en las acumulaciones de maderas alrededor de algunos arboles en la ciudad. El palo, procesado y “consumido”, retorna a su origen. Baldoné, que es baba de bejuco y semilla de guizazo sacude el universo vegetal, rechaza la epifanía del carpintero: la cara y el canto tecnológicos. Madera es madera. Hace un lazo (loop) el movimiento del palo por la urbe. De árbol a árbol cierra un círculo. En el ínterin, porque eso es lo que permite Dadá, el madero es sujeto de labor, unidad de tiempo, valor de cambio, objeto de norma. O al menos idealmente.

Alli donde las cosas no pueden ser nombradas como Home Legend Honey, Marazzi Imperial Slate, Three Rivers Gold Slate, –donde aun no arriba Home Depot– las materias están subyugadas por la fuerza de la necesidad, esa latencia tan poderosa como el bejuco, que puede encerrar un campo de café o ahogar un rio.

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Nov 252012
 

The Nightclub invites you to Marakka 2012, the ninth of twelve events involving a network of artists, producers, and art students. Its aim is to create dialogue within a diversity of art practice through curated exhibitions showcased in a one—night venue.
macrovision

Magdiel Aspillaga and Ernesto Oroza | curators
December 7, 7-11 pm
Address: Buena Vista Building, 180 NE 39 St. Suite 204, Miami FL 33137

Since 1983, Waldo Fernandez has been assembling an archive of Cuban audiovisual memory. The collection–which functions commercially under the “Marakka 2000” brand–relies and exploits a loophole created by current Cuba-U.S. diplomatic relations, and is sustained by a precise and astute understanding of current procedures regarding the protection of copyright in the U.S.
Continue reading »

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Nov 212012
 
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Nov 122012
 

Mondes electriques

The Espace Fondation EDF spotlights the so-called simplicity of electric energy through an original exhibition open to the world…
From Wednesday 14 November 2012 to Sunday 17 March 2013
Espace Fondation EDF
Curator: Alain Beltran. Directeur de recherche au CNRS

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Nov 112012
 

macrovision

Marakka 2012 is a project by Magdiel Aspillaga and Ernesto Oroza

First presentation: December 7, 7-11 pm
Address: Buena Vista Building, 180 NE 39 St. Suite 204, Miami FL 33137

Since 1983, Waldo Fernandez “Marakka” has been assembling an archive of Cuban audiovisual memory. The collection–which functions commercially under the “Marakka 2000” brand–relies and exploits a loophole created by current Cuba-U.S. diplomatic relations, and is sustained by a precise and astute understanding of current procedures regarding the protection of copyright in the U.S.
Each generation of emigrants has put its own nostalgic claims to the archive, which has more that 14,000 objects. Waldo has processed all this material in order to add new credits, remove sensitive copyright issues, and even re-edit the dramaturgical time and pace of serials and soap operas in order to adjust them for suitable commercial formats. The pinnacle of the archive lies in the documentaries that Waldo himself has directed and edited using video clips and sounds from his collection.
“Marakka 2012” is a revision of “Marakka 2000”. From our perspective, Waldo’s archive is above all else a registry of its own constitution. A repertoire of source formats, a history of the transfers produced and the copying technologies employed. A deposit of all the available resolutions of the last 70 years. A monument to piracy, to the glory of anti-macrovisions.

http://www.marakka2000.com

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Nov 012012
 

YERBA BUENA CENTER OF ARTS
Scaffolds are only rarely independent structures: conversation on the temporal landscape (Screening)
William Cordova’s program at Yerba Buena Center: smoke signals: viviendo pa’ la ciudad
Nov 3, 2012 2:00pm – 5:00pm
FREE with gallery admission
A double feature of Drylongso (1998), a film by Cauleen Smith, with the director in attendance, and Para construir una casa (1972) by Nicolás Guillén Landrián, which is followed by a talk on the film and a presentation on Architecture of Necessity by Miami-based artist Ernesto Oroza.

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Oct 012012
 

chain
chains-moreno-oroza-1

Chains
4.11 – 14.11. 2012

David Adamo,  Florian Baudrexel,  Matthias Bitzer,  Lutz Braun,  Cornelia Brintzinger,  Rick Buckley,  Nathan Carter,  Aleksander Cigale,  Sibylla Dumke,  Isabelle Fein,  Berta Fischer,  Annette Frick,  Tine Furler,  Olivier Guesselé-Garai & Antje Majewski,  Julian Göthe,  Sebastian Hammwöhner,  Eric Hattan,  Uwe Henneken,  Willhelm Hein,  Gregor Hildebrandt,  Alexandra Hopf,  Dani Jakob,  Alicija Kwade,  Matthias Lahme,  Nathan Mabry,  Frank Maier, Jonathan Monk,  Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza,  Boris Mrkonjic,  Ariane Müller & Martin Ebner,  Yasmin Müller,  Edit Oderbolz,  Henrik Olesen & Kirsten Pieroth,  Julia Pfeiffer,   Roseline Rannoch,  Gunter Reski,  Anselm Reyle,  Stefan Rinck,  Matthew Ronay,  Annette Ruenzler,  Björn Saul,  Anja Schwörer,  Markus Selg,  Setareh Shabhazi,  Juliane Solmsdorf,  Dominik Steiner,  Katja Strunz,  David Thorpe,  Wawa Tokarski,  Jens Ullrich,  Anke Völk,  Gabriel Vormstein,  Klaus Weber,  Marcus Weber,  Alexander Wolff,  Claudia ZweifelOpening: So. 4.11. 2012 16 – 21 Uhr
HORSE, Boxhagenerstr. 93, 10245 Berlin
kuratiert von Dani Jakob, Gabriel Vormstein, Sebastian HammwöhnerÖffnungszeiten 5.11. – 14.11. 12 nach telefonischer Vereinbarung: 0178 2984987 oder 0163 2533978 oder Kontakt über: horseberlin@gmx.de

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Sep 272012
 

reciprocity-siglotype

Mapping the Design World Meeting Point at Reciprocity. Curated by Max Borka

The Work of Ernesto Oroza will be highlighted at the Mapping the Design World Meeting Point at Reciprocity, the Design Biennial for Social Innovation in Liege, Belgium, from October 5 through October 28 2012, and will also feature in the accompanying MAP-Mapping the Design World magazine – focusing on some 100 examples of (Do) Good Design from an equal number of countries.

http://www.designliege.be/fr-287-mapping_the_design_world.html

CUBA/ ERNESTO OROZA AND THE CUBANS’ TECHNOLOGICAL DISOBEDIENCE/ The term Technological Disobedience was recently coined by the Cuban artist and designer Ernesto Oroza to summarize and describe the unique way in which his compatriots relate to technology: pressured and constrained by a crisis that is hitting harder and harder, and with no industry in the country, the average Cuban survives by totally disrespecting, surpassing and completely violating the “authority” and often even very complex technology of the objects that are still lingering around, thinking far beyond the capacities and uses these objects were originally meant for by their producer. Partially supported by the authorities, that even produced manuals on the subject, their audacity reaches that far that many even put their own life at risk, as is the case with the Rikimbili or improvised motorcycles. Nevertheless: scarcity has provided them with a creative richness that so-called technologically advanced countries have totally lost. And now that the crisis starts to globalize, it makes the average Cuban also much better prepared for the future – Max Borka reports.

The Meet ing Point is meant to be more than just a place where visitors can meet and greet, and find out about RECIPROCITY’s programme. As a platform for Mapping the Design World, it also offers an insight into what will be the Biennial’s central focus in the years to come: social innovation. Highlighting a multitude of activities, it tries to answer the question ‘What is social design?’ , while offering a taste of the richness that characterizes the rapidly growing number of projects in the field. Visitors are invited to reflect on how these examples could impact on their own life, and that of Liège, a city re-inventing itself through a series of large-scale schemes. Last but not least, the platform also tries to make clear that – far from being the result of a marketing strategy – this decision to focus on social design was born out of need, and the strong belief that if design still wants to make any sense, it will have to get social. As one of the engines of the Industrial Revolution on the European continent, Liège has also been at the cradle of design as we have known it over the last two centuries. It therefore seems logical that, now that post-industrial times have come, Liège also pioneers its future.
The star ting point for Mapping was to show 100 projects from an equal number of lands, with a clear preference for those countries largely off the conventional design radar, such as Afghanistan or Zambia. Positive discrimination also determined the selection of an average of one project per country, giving the same value to inconspicuous places like the Faroe- and Lofoten Islands as to the USA, Russia and China. Finally, rather than going for the most important project in each country –  reducing the innumerable emergency shelters or schools developed for third world countries – we took a more panoramic view. Although some detours took place on route, the final destination followed the initial plan, resulting in a deformed image of a topsy-turvy world that offers a life-affirming compensation for the equally distorted images we are usually confronted with.
But please: this outcome makes no claim to be representative or exhaustive.  Instead, it’s a selection that suggests the endless range of strategies, and the extraordinary dynamics with which these possibilities are being exploited; an imaginativeness, enthusiasm and even joyfulness that totally refutes the cynicism, despair and dreariness that often accompanies social design. Working in diverse realms, which are often hardly connected, their order of battle is scattered: eco design, sustainable and experimental design, critical-, political- and radical design, anti-design, up cycling and recycling, re- this, re-that, re-whatever. Their goals and methods differ greatly. And yet, what binds them is stronger: a mutual striving for what in an ideal world every form of design should take as its main goal, namely the interests and well-being of society as a whole, and not just those of one particular group, let alone exclusively the interests of corporate industry. Each in its own way has also raised rebellion against the tyranny of what is proclaimed to be good design by consumer society: slick, glamorous, luxurious, or simply practical objects of desire, good-looking and highly seductive, but also lethal and perilous — ‘formes fatales’ that promise heaven, but are a one-way ticket to its antipode.
Parallel to generic design’s global explosion and implosion on a semantic level, other fundamentals are causing a worldwide crisis, which even the most hard-core cannot ignore. This ongoing turmoil plays directly to the Biennial’s theme, the relationship between design and memory: in its eternal celebration of the new, design suffers from an innate Alzheimer, wherein the logic of permanent renewal that has to guarantee a return of investment also resulted in overproduction, a programmed obsoleteness of goods, and a market that is oversaturated — the only way out: conquer new territories. Not only does this have disastrous consequences in terms of working conditions or waste, with design being an offspring from the West, but it has also wiped other cultures away entirely, erasing their memory and identity.
All along this process, the last word in the magical formula Form follows Function expanded to Finance & Fashion, Fun, Funk & Fuck, Fiction & Friction, or Fury & Fairy. Yet other F-words urgently have to be added and replace them, such as Famine, Favela, Fai-da-te, Fragility and Foco or Foquismo, the ideology that grew out of Che Guevara’s premise that a small group of dedicated people can set off a revolution based on a hit-and-run guerrilla strategy. By nature, and in opposition to the power game of corporate industry, most of the initiatives highlighted in Mapping are small to humble. What they propose may also come far too late, their effect hardly exceeding that of the proverbial drop of water on the proverbial hot plate. And yet: the power of social networking alone often raises their impact far beyond the local level, making them not unlike Edward Norton Lorenz’ butterflies, which can alter the path of a tornado in Texas by flapping their wings in Brazil. Useless as it may be in isolation, imagine what would happen if they started to do so together, and Mapping aspires to be a catalyzer that helps synchronize all that flapping.

Mapping the Design World 
Curator : Max Borka
Assitant : Hanne Vanhaesebrouck
Scenography :
Concept : Max Borka
Design : Johanna Dehio & Dominik Hehl / www.johannadehio.de / dominikhehl.de/
Graphic Design :
Fremdkörper (Andrea Mehlhose & Martin Wellner)
Photography : Anna Pannekoek

Practical information

VENUE:

Musée de la Vie wallonne
Espace Saint-Antoine
cour des Mineurs
4000 Liège
www.viewallonne.be

OPENING TIME:

October 5th – 28th 2012
Tuesday to Sunday : 9.30am-6pm
Monday : group visits on reservation

OPENING :

Thrusday 4 October 2012 from 6pm
Entrance :

Free admission / sign up on
www.designliege.be/registration (limited capacity)
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Sep 172012
 

Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship Exhibition 2012
September 22,
2012 University Galleries, Florida Atlantic University
777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431
ARTISTS IN THE EXHIBITION: Nellie Appleby, Domingo Castillo, Clifton Childree, Phillip Estlund,Jiae Hwang, Eric Landes, Nicolas Lobo, Mark Moormann,Ernesto Oroza, John Sanchez and Tom Scicluna.

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Sep 012012
 
ERNESTO-OROZA-Ujamaa-2013

Ernesto Oroza. Ujamaa (diagrams) – 2012

More info here: http://www.ernestooroza.com/category/ujamaa/

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Aug 292012
 

Worker, build your own machinery! – ¡Obrero, construye tu maquinaria!
Available now through Textos Moire


Embroidered Polo shirt, 2012

ernesto-oroza-t-shirt-2

I’m doing an appropriation of an Ernesto Guevara’s statement from 1961. I have deleted his last name as author of this phrase.
Appropriation, reinvention and repairs should be understood as tactics that propel the “technological disobedience”. Practices that the communist revolution promoted as alternatives to the country’s stalled productive sector— and become the most reliable resource for Cubans to navigate the inefficiencies of the Communist political system. Workers who had devoted their imagination and resourcefulness to keeping the revolution on its feet were then forced to employ those attributes to endure lives short on necessities.

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